Future home for my Fine Feathered Friends


Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

Last Christmas my brother-in-law gave me this great teapot planted with a beautiful green plant.  Unfortunately, it didn’t take long for me to kill the beautiful green plant. The leaves started dropping like it was fall and soon it was an ugly brown plant. I swear it was an accident and I assure you it wasn’t so I could make a cute birdhouse from the teapot.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

I could have easily just nailed the teapot to the nearest tree but that would have been the shortest tutorial ever, so I decided to add a little oomph to my otherwise plain teapot.

First step was to get holes into the bottom of the pot. I’m assuming that none of my drillbits are for metal because they didn’t even dent the bottom.  Had to resort to a more caveman effort of hammer and nail. Hey, whatever works.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

My teapot needed a little house and what better house than wood salvaged from an old farm’s fence.  I had tried to use these pieces before for the top of a stool but the wood was so warped that it made my stool wobbly (that’s why this side of the wood has a finish).

The fencing pieces were attached with a couple of L brackets screwed on the back.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

This is the front of those wobbly pieces. Through the holes, I’ve marked where the screws are going to go and predrilled the holes.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

Side pieces were cut from another piece of fencing, sawed in half with a 30 degree cut at the end. The length of the side pieces is about 1 1/2 inches longer than the back.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

A roof piece was cut 2 inches wider than the whole little house. The roof piece is the full width of the fence board so that it overhangs the side pieces.

Attached all the pieces with a nail gun to hold everything together, then followed up with wood screws.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

At the last minute I decided the house needed a base and tacked on a piece of pallet wood.

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

Teakettle birdhouse with reclaimed wood

A couple of notes to make with this type of birdhouse.  Since metal gets really hot in the sun put your house in a very shady spot high enough to keep predators away.  And, if you have the lid to your teapot, attach the lid and drill a smaller hole.  The smaller songbirds like a hole 1 1/4 – 1 1/2 inches.  If none of the nesting birds like my house it may have to turn into a birdfeeder.

All ready for my first visitor. I figure if my little bird friends will make a nest in my stove exhaust pipe they’ll make a nest anywhere.

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