Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy


Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Back in March I shared with you my coat rack made from old railroad spikes. At the time, I wanted to make another project from the railroad spikes and I settled on a wine rack. I knew #2 son, Kevin, didn’t care for his current wine rack and was looking to make a change.  Would he be interested in a rack made from salvaged wood and railroad spikes?  Why yes, yes he would. It took another couple of months to make it back to the salvage yard where I found the wood for my storage cupboard. I have no idea what I’ve been doing since then, but I’m pretty sure summer got in the way… but now I’m ready to go. At the salvage yard I got 2 pieces of wood, 2 inches thick, 8 inches wide, and over 8 feet tall.  They weren’t quite the same, the top one was much heavier and had a darker finish, but since they were the same width and thickness, they would do just fine. If you don’t have a supply of railroad spikes check out the listings on Ebay, most of the railroad spikes go for about a dollar or less.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

After the wood had been sitting around the house for a few months I finally got Kevin over for a consult.

     Do you want the boards flush together or apart?  Apart.

     Should I get another board so that the wine bottles sit  entirely in the space?  No, 2 pieces are great.

     Would you like the bottles completely horizontal or tilted?  Tilted.

  You can see why this project has taken so long, soooo many instructions. 🙂

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Before just drilling holes and nailing spikes, I did a test board, the same width as my backing.  This was a test to see if the wine bottle would just fly off the rack if the spikes were not level.  While the bottle didn’t just fly off, it wasn’t secure enough that I would trust it. 

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Next test, the spikes are level and the bottle seems much more secure.  Can still have the bottle slightly tilting down by placing the spike in the neck of the bottle.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

The boards were cut the total measurement of floor to ceiling.  Why not stop at the baseboard?…you ask.  I’m so glad you asked, ok, maybe you didn’t…but this is how the wine rack would just stick out from the wall 2 inches. Kind of odd.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

If you went over top of the baseboard then the wine rack would not sit flush with the wall.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

In order to go to the floor and sit flush, you’re going to have to notch out the wine rack on the back.

These cut lines were made by just running a circular saw back and forth adjusted for the depth of the baseboard.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Once the lines are cut, it’s extremely easy to knock out the excess wood with a hammer and chisel.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Back on the front, the boards were kind of rough, so went over them quickly with my hand sander…

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

…followed by a coat of dark wax, painted on and rubbed off and the boards are now closer to the same color.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Now for placing the wine bottles…with chalk, I marked a line the length of the boards 1  1/2″ from the sides.  This will be the line that the spikes are nailed.

When the spikes are 7 inches apart, this is how close the bottles will be.  They fit, but Kevin would need an awful lot of bottles to fill the rack…not that he would mind (The sideways spikes are just there to keep the bottles from rolling away while I do my testing)

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

This is how close the bottles would be at 10 inches apart. Ten inches it is!

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

With a L-square, marked where each of the holes will go.  The L-square keeps the holes level.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

A 5/8″ drillbit is perfect for predrilling the spike holes.  Don’t drill all the way through or the spike could get loose, you want it to be tight when hammering.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

For in between the boards I decided to use a rusty sheet of iron.  This is the first look you’re getting at one of two tools my sons gave me for my birthday, an angle grinder. It may seem like an odd present, but I had a few pieces of odd shaped metal around and no way to cut them. The other tool was a mini kreg jig.  My sons love me. 😉 

Actually the piece of rusty metal is another present but that’s another story.  If you would like to read about that scavenging adventure, you can find it here.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Just start hammering your spikes. The inside spike is tilted in slightly to match the neck of the bottle.

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Didn’t have a car big enough this weekend to haul it down to son #2’s house. Hopefully next weekend.  I’m sure he’ll love it! Of course he’d love it even more if we stocked it. Pretty sure that’s not going to happen.

If I ever get there I’ll be sure to take pictures.

I almost forgot…for attaching to the wall, I have 8 bolts, 2 for each top and bottom and construction adhesive for the metal. Now you’re ready to go and make that wine cellar.

Railroad spike coat rack, Upcycled railroad spikes, Railroad spikes wall hangar diy

For one more railroad spike project, check out the coat rack.  Super simple project with lots of impact!

Railroad Spike Wine Rack diy

Update: As promised this is how the wine rack looks in my sons dining room. Unfortunately he had only one bottle of wine to test the rack that day but we quickly remedied that little problem.

 

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